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How to Prepare for an Inspection
No home is perfect. Anything from major damage to minor maintenance issues can be found. Even new homes are not immune – they could have problems with the plumbing, electrical system, heating and cooling system, or the roofing system just to name a few.

  • As the BUYER and the person paying for the inspection, you will have already done your homework and hired an inspector that you feel comfortable with - hopefully us. Either you or your realtor will have scheduled the inspection and we are all present and ready to take a look at the property at the appointed time.  There are a few things that you can and should do to make the most of this opportunity.
  • A general rule of thumb is that the inspection will take 1 hour per 1000 square feet of property.  This, of course, will vary depending on the age, condition and occupancy of the home.  If at all possible, plan on being present throughout the entire inspection.
  • Bring along company! If you want your parents' opinion, by all means, bring them.  Your children, your best friend in the construction business and your Great Aunt Dolly who will be helping you with the downpayment?  Bring them.  At Reliance, we want you to be present.  Having additional people in the home does not affect our ability to do our job.  Be aware though, that young children may be too distracting and tire too easily to allow you to make the most of this opportunity.
  • Ask questions! This is your opportunity to really find out about the home because up until now, you have probably spent an hour, at most, in the home and were too shy to really look in the bathroom cabinets.  If you see something in the home that concerns you, ask about it.  If the inspector is talking about shingle grit and you don't know what that means - ask!  At Reliance, we will explain what we are doing, while we are doing it and welcome any questions along the way.  Any inspector (and there are plenty out there) that won't answer questions, are not working for you.
  • Read the report! You, and your realtor, will receive our inspection report within 24 hours via e-mail. Read the report in its entirety.  If you have questions, do not hesitate to contact us for clarification. 

As the SELLER and the person whose home everyone will be looking at, there are some things you can do to make this process go smoothly with as little inconvenience to you as possible.

  • Should you be present?  Your realtor may advise you to leave the property during the inspection however, it makes no difference to us.  In fact, having you present will allow us to ask clarification questions of repairs made and upkeep done to the home.
  • Accessibility.  Make sure that all areas of the home are accessible, especially to the attic and crawl space. 
  • Housekeeping.  The cleaner your home, the more secure you will feel about strangers being around your personal belongings.  We like to believe that everyone is trustworthy but why take the risk?  Tuck your prized possessions away for the day.  And a sink full of dishes makes it difficult to test the garbage disposal and plumbing.  Clean up, pick up and put away. 
  • Repairs.  Your realtor will have already recommended that minor repairs around the home be made prior to listing but make sure they are done. And if you are having a major repair done but it hasn't taken place yet, inform your realtor.  The Buyer may prefer to have the inspection done after the repair has been made.
  • Pets.  We all love them but they often get frantic and territorial with strangers around.  If possible, take your pet with you if you leave the home during the inspection.  If not possible and you are not present, LEAVE A NOTE about the pet's whereabouts.  There are a number of people going in and out of doors and gates and pets know freedom when they see it.  Is there a cat locked in the utility room?  A dog in the backyard? And if you have a pet door allowing your pet access to both the yard and house, let us know.  There is nothing more frustrating than to wrangle a dog back inside only to have it mysteriously appear in the yard again.